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View Table of Contents for Journal of Public Economic Theory volume 21 issue 5

I am happy to announce that my paper entitled “The importance of considering optimal government policy when social norms matter for the private provision of public goods“, co-authored with Guy Meunier from INRA, is forthcoming in the journal Journal of Public Economic Theory.

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I am very happy to announce that my article entitled “Climate Policy Must Favor Mitigation Over Adaptation” is forthcoming in the journal Environmental & Resource Economics. The main message is the following:

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Together with Martin Henseler I just published an article entitled “The impact of weather on economic growth and its production factors” in the journal Climatic Change.

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I am happy to announce that my article entitled “The Aggregation Dilemma in Climate Change Policy Evaluation” has been accepted for publication in the journal Climate Change Economics.

The article deals with the following question:

We show that a policy maker who ignores regional data and instead relies on aggregated integrated assessment models is likely underestimating the carbon price and thus the required climate policy. Based on a simple theoretical model we give conditions under which the Aggregation Dilemma is expected to play a role in climate change cost-benefit analysis. We then study the importance of the Aggregation Dilemma with the integrated assessment model RICE (Nordhaus, 2000).
Aggregating all regions of the RICE-99 model into one region yields a 40% lower social cost of carbon than the RICE model itself predicts. Based on extrapolating the results a country-level integrated assessment model would give a more than eight times higher social cost of carbon compared to a fully aggregated model. We suggest that these tentative results require researchers to re-think the aggregation level used in integrated assessment models and to develop models at much lower levels of aggregation than currently available.

Here is the article if you are interested: pdf

Just before the summer break I get this nice news in my mailbox:

Dear Prof. Ingmar Schumacher,

I am pleased to inform you that your paper has been accepted for publication in the European Journal of Operational Research.

So what is this paper about? It is a theoretical contribution together with Professor Georg Müller-Fürstenberger from the University of Trier on how inter-regional externalities can become overwhelmingly crucial if one considers a dynamic setting.

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wordleI am happy to announce that my article entitled “Threshold Preferences and the Environment”, co-authored with Benteng Zou from the University of Luxembourg, has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Mathematical Economics. While the journal will publish a slightly shortened version of the article (without section 2), you can find the full version HERE. What is the paper about?

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cultureThere is a new article of mine that I would like to announce, entitled “The endogenous formation of an environmental culture“, and I am happy to tell you that it is forthcoming in the journal the European Economic Review.

The article is summarized as follows:

This article presents a mechanism explaining the surge in environmental culture across the globe. Based upon empirical evidence, we develop an overlapping generations model with environmental quality and endogenous environmental culture. Environmental culture may be costlessly transmitted intergenerationally, or via costly education.

The model predicts that for low wealth levels, society is unable to free resources for environmental culture. In this case, society will only invest in environmental maintenance if environmental quality is sufficiently low. Once society has reached a certain level of economic development, then it may optimally invest a part of its wealth in developing an environmental culture. Environmental culture has not only a positive impact on environmental quality through lower levels of consumption, but it improves the environment through maintenance expenditure for wealth-environment combinations at which, in a restricted model without environmental culture, no maintenance would be undertaken. Environmental culture leads to a society with a higher indirect utility at steady state in comparison to the restricted model.

Our model leads us to the conclusion that, for societies trapped in a situation with low environmental quality, investments in culture may induce positive feedback loops, where more culture raises environmental quality which in turn raises environmental culture. We also discuss how environmental culture may lead to an Environmental Kuznets Curve.

So what is this all about?

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